Albert Dupontel : festival patron


 

 

 

When Albert Dupontel appeared on club and theatre stages in the early 1990s to the hilarity of his electrified audiences, he knew straight away that he would be one of the most exacting and atypical directors of French cinema. In the image of Rambo, his first stage success, Albert Dupontel is himself the relentless warrior. Having always been a cinema-lover, he secretly quit his medical degree to make his début. He took on a string of unforgettable roles both as actor (Sachs’ Disease, Irréversible, Le Convoyeur, Love Me No More, The Clink of the Ice, The Prey, Le Grand soir) and director (Bernie, The Creator, Locked Out, The Villain). Film-making is more than a craft for Albert Dupontel: it is something organic… vital… oxygen. Everything about him lives and breathes cinema. To assert his passion, ideas and style, he makes films as a soldier goes into battle: with a combination of furious energy and chilling determination.

His last film, 9 Month Stretch (2013), previewed as the closing film at War on Screen 2013, was his biggest success, with more than 2 millions visits in cinemas. In 2014, he returns to directing for the fifth time, reunited with Sandrine Kiberlain, 18 years after A Self-Made Hero.

Albert Dupontel, who has worked shoulder to shoulder with us since embarking on this adventure, will once again be here to share a cult film that is part of our world heritage, Wolfgang Petersen’s Das Boot.


Questions for Dupontel

 

What do you expect from a war film (given that you chose to introduce Requiem for a massacre last year and Das Boot this year)?

The overwhelming feeling I get thinking about fear that I have never experienced and that I hope never to experience.


In your opinion, who is the best war film actor?

Lee Marvin, from “Hell in the Pacific” to “Big Red One”.


What war film would you like to have acted in, or what role would you like to have had?

None. The only one I was in, “Intimate Enemies”, didn’t persuade me at all.


What war film music has had most impact on you?

Coppola’s use of Ride of the Valkyries, and in the same film, the opening sequence with The Doors…



 

 

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